The America's Longleaf Restoration Initiative (ALRI) is a collaborative effort of multiple public and private sector partners that actively supports range-wide efforts to restore and conserve longleaf pine ecosystems. The vision of the partners involved in the ALRI is to have functional, viable longleaf pine ecosystems with the full spectrum of ecological, economic and social values inspired through the voluntary involvement of motivated organizations and individuals.

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2017 Range-wide Accomplishment Report

2017 Range-wide Accomplishment Report

2017 proved to be yet another year of impressive accomplishments for the America's Longleaf Restoration Initiative! Find out how our partners' efforts to bring back healthy longleaf pine forests across the Southeast are paying off!
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2016 Range-wide Accomplishment Report

2016 Range-wide Accomplishment Report

2016 continued the trend of impressive accomplishments for the America's Longleaf Restoration Initiative! Find out how partners are coming together to bring back healthy longleaf pine forests across the Southeast!
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Strategic Priorities and Actions 2016-2018

Strategic Priorities and Actions 2016-2018

This report details where priorities should be placed and identifies what actions should be taken to advance the long term goal of restoring the millions of acres of longleaf pine.
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What's New

Fall 2018 Longleaf Partnership Council Meeting

Fall 2018 Longleaf Partnership Council Meeting The Longleaf Partnership Council recently met to discuss the business of ALRI and engage with other longleaf enthusiasts at the 12th Bienniel Longleaf Conference in Alexandria, Louisiana, on October 22-23, 2018. Click the title to read all about it!

ALRI Partners Featured in Longleaf Leader Article

ALRI Partners Featured in Longleaf Leader Article The feature article of the Longleaf Alliance's Fall 2018 newsletter, The Longleaf Leader, showcases how ALRI came to start, how the different conservation groups, state and federal agencies, and private landowners work together to restore the longleaf ecosystem, as well as why this successful model of cooperative partnership can be used for other at-risk habitats.